Why Blacks Should Avoid Missouri

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is warning African-Americans about traveling to Missouri. A new travel advisory was issued last week after the highly controversial Senate Bill 43 was passed that makes it more difficult to sue for housing or employment discrimination. Once the law goes into effect, fired employees must prove discrimination was the main reason for their firing, not just a contributing factor.

“The bill would allow discrimination to run rampant in the workplace. We’ve actually rolled back protections for our most vulnerable citizens,” State Rep. Brandon Ellington (D-Kansas City) was quoted as saying. “People should be concerned that we have a national organization that is painting Missouri as a racist state … People should be cautious about coming to a state that values civil rights so little that we’re willing to change the law to allow discrimination.”

A new report from the Missouri Attorney General’s Office claims that black drivers in the state are 75 percent more likely to be pulled over than white drivers. The number of complaints involving police brutality, racism on university campuses and racial profiling by police has significantly increased in recent years.

The NAACP is working hard to get the word out and caution African-Americans about traveling to Missouri.

“People should be cautious about coming to a state that values civil rights so little that we’re willing to change the law to allow discrimination,” Ellington said.

@Robinrazzi


Follow Me:

Robin is a digital content creator and has worked in the digital space for nearly ten years. "Robinrazzi" is a nickname given from a former colleague and is a perfect integration of her name and one of her greatest hobbies of having a camera in hand to capture once in a lifetime moments like paparazzi. She has traveled the world covering entertainment, celebrities, events and anything trending. She holds a BA in communications from Penn State and MS in marketing from Johns Hopkins University. She currently serves as Digital Content Coordinator for WHUR.

Stay Connected:

Comments Welcome