African American child prodigies you should know

With all the recent posts and comments of children with bad behaviors that require various extremes of parental discipline, we wanted to salute young people for being the best and brightest.

If you only watched the evening news or depended on pop culture to paint a picture of young blacks, you would probably think that the majority of black youngsters were only ambitious about sports and music, or caught up in crime and other debauchery.

However, the face of black success isn’t limited to the fields that are occupied by Jay-Z, Beyonce and LeBron James. There are a multitude of young blacks who are achieving at a high level in science, math, classical music, chess and other knowledge-based areas and preparing to change society.

genius Rochelle Ballantyne

At 17, Rochelle Ballantyne is one of the top chess players in the world. She is currently on the verge of becoming the first black American female to earn the title of chess master.


Ginger Howard

Ginger Howard is the youngest black American woman to become a pro golfer. Howard is competing to become the fifth black American woman to join the LPGA Tour.


Tony Hansberry II

Tony used failure as inspiration. After he didn’t place in the eighth grade science fair, Tony interned at Shands Hospital and developed a method of reducing the amount of time it takes to perform hysterectomies and potentially reducing the risk of complications after the procedure. He was honored for his contributions.


Stephen R. Stafford II

Stephen entered Morehouse College at the age of 11 and picked up three majors. Now 16, he is currently studying computer science and mathematics. He will likely graduate at 17.


Autum Ashante

Raised by a single father, Autum was ridiculed by highly regarded conservatives at the age of 7 for writing a poem that highlighted the travesty of slavery. Autum never wavered and mastered languages such as Arabic, Swahili and Spanish. She scored 149 on the standard IQ test. At age 13, she was accepted into the University of Connecticut.


Mabou Loiseau

By the age of 7, Loiseau spoke French, Creole, Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic and Russian. She also plays the harp, clarinet, violin, drums, guitar and piano.

Do you know about any exceptional young people in the DMV?  If so, please post a comment about them so we can celebrate the wonderful things that are happening with young people right here in our community.

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